What do I blog about? (Part II)

written by Mikaela Cowles on April 11, 2013 in Blogging with no comments

Writing What do I blog about? (Part II)Deciding what to blog about can be intimidating. It can be time consuming. It can be downright overwhelming. But it doesn’t have to be. You’re in business. You’re a professional. And, you’re good at what you do. You know things other people don’t. Remember this – you are the expert.

To you things about your job may seem commonplace, obvious, and uninteresting. To others they aren’t. You’re starting a blog so you can share your wealth of knowledge, display your expertise, and answer frequently asked questions (FAQs). This means every day at work you’re experiencing something about which you can blog.

Begin by creating a list of FAQs. For example:

in the Mortgage Industry
How long will it take to complete my loan?
Why do you have to run my credit?
What documents do I need to have my credit run?
What kinds of loans should I consider?
What should I look for in a loan officer?

in the Apparel Industry
Where can I find your clothes?
Who wears your clothes?
What’s your return policy?
How should I wash my new shirt to keep the color vibrant?

in the Restaurant Industry
What specials do you offer?
Where can I park?
Do you deliver?
Do you offer takeout?
How do I make a reservation?

Over time, this list will grow. Your answers may change. Your services may expand. All of these are new blog post topics. Beyond the FAQs, create a list of industry jargon. These are terms thrown around between colleagues and other likeminded professionals which the rest of us might not know. For example:

in baseball
Five Tool Player
Around the Horn
Double Clutch

in writing
Periodic Sentence
Contractions
Rule of Three

in Social Media
@Mention
Tag
Newsfeed

Now that you’ve identified your FAQs and industry jargon, we get to the fun part. Start a third list detailing your experiences. What type of phone calls do you field? What’s something a client has done to make the process better or worse? What have you observed that you really agree with or don’t?

At this point, one of the main concerns I often encounter is: I don’t want to talk about that. This may be because it’s sensitive material. That’s completely understandable. Right now, we’re just creating lists. These are between you, your pen, and paper. Nothing is public until you publish it.

The longer your lists, the more material from which you can pull. Perhaps you won’t share some of the sensitive stories, but they could spark ideas for different posts. So write them down with a few brief notes.

In the next post, we’ll discuss a few techniques for handling sensitive stories.

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