January’s Reading Roundup

written by Mikaela Cowles on February 4, 2016 in Book Recommendations with no comments

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Do you wish you found time to read more?

Me too!

This is why I’ve decided to make reading a priority in 2016. Each month I’m selecting at least one “fun” book (probably a novel or memoir) and one “helpful” book (probably a tutorial of some kind) to read.

January’s reading list included: 

 

Life From Scratch: a memoir of foods, family, and forgiveness by Sasha Martin

This brilliant memoir strikes a poignant balance between unimaginable hardship and epic love. It is unapologetic in its description of poverty, but also childlike in its innocence. Martin looks at the way her mother turned moments of potential despair into a feeling of opulence. At the heart of it all, there was food. An always-present character, food guides us through Martin’s life with a comforting hand. I’d recommend it to anyone, whether you’re a foodie or not.

 

Between You & Me by Mary Norris

This book is going to need its own post, which will come, but for now, here’s the brief rundown. GO GET THIS BOOK NOW! I have never, ever, read a grammar book that is laugh out loud funny. This is the kind of book that inspires you to look at grammar in an entirely new light. Heck, Norris makes grammar downright sexy.

 

Kitchens of the Great Midwest by J. Ryan Stradal

I expected this novel to actually be about kitchens throughout the Midwest – literally. I thought it would be a roundup of kitchen tales. It’s not. It follows a girl, from before she was even conceived, through childhood and into adulthood. It showcases the many different people whose lives she touches. It displays the wit and intelligence needed to overcome the incredible circumstances of her birth. Ultimately, there’s food, as the title would suggest. But, there’s so much more than that. There’s love, loss, and an undeniable lesson that those of us who are willing to work hard and risk it all will be the ones given the chance to succeed.

 

The Secret by Rhonda Byrne

This book it is packed with fantastic life insights. It outlines the power of thoughts in a way that forces you to consider your own thought pattern. Additionally, it offers practical examples of how to work on reshaping your thoughts to reshape your life. Having said that it is not particularly well written. It is riddled with strange grammatical errors. It doesn’t have a literary flow that forces you to turn page after page mindlessly.

 





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